STANDING RIB ROAST or PRIME RIB

This is as easy as it gets!  After testing and doing a lot of research, I’ve concluded the simplest recipe is the best!!   The size you should get is as follows:

4 people-2 rib roast         6 people-3 rib roast       8 people-4 rib roast

It’s important to have the butcher cut off the bones from the bottom of the roast (as close to the meat as possible) and then place the bones back on the meat and tie it on.  Believe me, this will make carving so easy.  Also, save the bones and make your own beef stock for future use!

  • Prime Rib Roast, at room temperature (very important)
  • 2 T butter, room temperature
  • fresh ground pepper

Take out the prime rib from the refrigerator approx. 3 hours before you plan to cook it, it should be room temperature when you place it in the oven.  Preheat oven to 450 degrees.

Pat the prime rib dry with paper towels, spread the soften butter on the cut ends of the rib.  Sprinkle with ground pepper.   DO NOT USE SALT, yes, hard to believe, but the salt will pull out the juices, you can salt after cooking, but you really won’t need to!

Place the prime rib in a heavy stainless-steel roasting pan, it should be at least 3 inches deep.  The roast should be placed ribs down and fat side up.  The ribs act as the natural rack, so do not use another rack.

Sear the rib roast for 15 minutes at 450 degrees, then turn the oven to 325 degrees.  Do not cover the pan.  You can use a meat thermometer place in the meat or check after 2 hours with an instant read thermometer, with any method, to achieve a medium-rare roast, the internal temperature should be 130 degrees.  Make sure you stick the thermometer in the thickest part of the beef, not touching the bone.

When temperature is perfect, (to me that’s 130 degrees),  take the rib roast out of the oven, cover it loosely with foil and let it rest for 20 minutes.  Do not skip the resting phase, it needs to distribute the juices.   Now, carve and serve!

Estimate times for cooking:

  • 2 ribs, 4 to 5 pounds, 450 degrees/325 degrees, 70 minutes
  • 3 ribs, 7 to 8.5 pounds,  ”                    ”                 , 1   3/4 hours
  • 4 ribs, 9 to 10.5 pounds,  ”                  ”                 , 2  1/4 hours
  • 5 ribs, 11 to 13.5 pounds,  ”                 ”                  , 2  3/4 hours

The are approximate, and should be checked the last 45 minutes of cooking, It’s very important to go by internal temperature instead of time.   Here is a chart of various cooking temperatures:

  • Rare                   120 to 125 degrees
  • Medium Rare   130 to 135 degrees

Best served with Au Jus Gravy    and/or  Sour Cream Horseradish Sauce, here are the recipes:

Au Jus Gravy:

When the cooked prime rib roast is resting, make the “au jus”.

  • 2 C beef broth
  • 1 C red wine
  • pan drippings
  • salt & fresh ground pepper to taste

After removing beef from pan, place the pan on the stove, it should cover two burners. Remove all but 3 tablespoons of fat from the pan.   De-fat the juices by adding the broth and scraping up the bits on the pan.  Add the wine and salt & pepper, simmer over low heat until reduced,   approx. 10 min., stirring occasionally.  Serve in a gravy bowl along side the rib roast.

Sour Cream Horseradish Sauce:

  • 1 C sour cream
  • 2 T prepared horseradish
  • 1 T fresh-squeezed lemon juice
  • 3/4 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 tsp sugar

In a medium size bowl, combine sour cream, horseradish, lemon juice, salt and sugar.  Mix thoroughly.  Refrigerate until ready to serve.  Serve in individual containers.

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One Response to STANDING RIB ROAST or PRIME RIB

  1. Moxy says:

    Thanks for different method. These days, it seems that starting roasts at room temperature is considered to be the best. Odd, how practices change through times. You might find my recipe interesting. Keep up the good work!

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